Under Construction
feelinranty:


necessary-sass:

curlybrownboy:

belindapendragon:

kobetyrant:

HOW IS THIS NOT EVERYWHERE?

Reblogging this good news…again.

y’all know EXACTLY why this isn’t everywhere. don’t pretend to be oblivious

Well let’s spread the word then guys. This kid deserves all the attention.

"Ramarni, what will you do when you grow up?"
"Literally everything."
So excited when I hear stories like this because imagine what he will accomplish

feelinranty:

necessary-sass:

curlybrownboy:

belindapendragon:

kobetyrant:

HOW IS THIS NOT EVERYWHERE?

Reblogging this good news…again.

y’all know EXACTLY why this isn’t everywhere. don’t pretend to be oblivious

Well let’s spread the word then guys. This kid deserves all the attention.

"Ramarni, what will you do when you grow up?"

"Literally everything."

So excited when I hear stories like this because imagine what he will accomplish

(Source: lawdgevus)

(Source: fcukk)

(Source: russellstyles)

(Source: s-a-e-c-u-l-u-m)

cwtae-worklikefuckuntilim65:

ladypapalade:

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.
the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.
A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.
Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.
The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)
Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years
The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)
A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt
7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait
7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province. 
Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.


Can we discuss the fact that they apparently travelled that great dangerous distance TO GET HIGH.

The statement I have copied below and italicized is absolute bullshit. EVERY society has fought and tried to take over other different societies. From the beginning of historical records. Middle Eastern tribes fought each other WAY before the birth of Jesus (and look what they’re doing now - fighting still), African tribes fought and still fight each other, the Chinese fought both Koreans and the Japanese for centuries and still are belligerent towards each other, Mesoamerican city-states fought and annihilated each other, Greek city-states, and so on and so on forever past and forever future. It’s the nature of all humans, not just white Europeans.
Intolerant fuckers quit shaming ANY race. 
It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

cwtae-worklikefuckuntilim65:

ladypapalade:

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.

the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.

A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.

Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.

The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)

Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years

The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)

A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt

7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait

7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province.

Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.

Can we discuss the fact that they apparently travelled that great dangerous distance TO GET HIGH.

The statement I have copied below and italicized is absolute bullshit. EVERY society has fought and tried to take over other different societies. From the beginning of historical records. Middle Eastern tribes fought each other WAY before the birth of Jesus (and look what they’re doing now - fighting still), African tribes fought and still fight each other, the Chinese fought both Koreans and the Japanese for centuries and still are belligerent towards each other, Mesoamerican city-states fought and annihilated each other, Greek city-states, and so on and so on forever past and forever future. It’s the nature of all humans, not just white Europeans.

Intolerant fuckers quit shaming ANY race.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

thatsomethingsomething:

Brad Pitt in Killing Them Softly.

comicsalliance:

THE PEN IS TRULY MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD: SCREENWRITER SAM HAMM TALKS BATMAN ’89
By Patrick A. Reed
Twenty five years ago, in 1989, there was nothing bigger than Tim Burton’s Batman.  The movie was a box-office smash, and was accompanied by an unprecedented merchandising blitz.  Bat-trading cards, Bat-shirts, Bat-soundtracks, Bat-toys, Bat-meals, Bat-hats, Bat-candy, Bat-books – the logo and likenesses were everywhere you looked.  And the film’s impact is still being felt today.  It was a big-budget production with proper movie stars that changed the way the world thought about comic book movies evermore.

Earlier this summer, ComicsAlliance published a series of pieces reflecting on the importance of Batman ’89 – and now, as the summer of 2014 winds to a close, we spoke to screenwriter Sam Hamm about his work on the landmark film and his thoughts on its legacy as a perfect postscript to our 25th anniversary Bat-celebration.


ComicsAlliance: Were there any cut sequences that you wish had made it into the finished film?

Sam Hamm:Several!

1)  I had a highly ingenious third-act introduction for the Bat-signal that I still miss.

2) I had originally handled the murder of Bruce’s parents as a dream Vicki has after being spirited off to the Batcave and recognizing Bruce behind his cowl. The plotline of Vicki accidentally discovering Batman’s identity by digging into Bruce’s past was mostly lost in the finished picture.

3) The studio insisted on having Robin in the picture, and Tim and I couldn’t figure out how or where to squeeze him in. We spent a whole weekend pacing around in a sweat, but we couldn’t get anywhere, and we finally decided that we would have to call the WB brass and tell them there would be no Robin. Then, moments away from picking up the phone, we started spitballing again, and miraculously, we came up with a really cool Robin sequence. So a couple of years later, when production is underway, and the picture is running over budget, what does the studio decide to cut? You guessed it – Robin!  And in the end, nobody missed him.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

THE PEN IS TRULY MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD: SCREENWRITER SAM HAMM TALKS BATMAN ’89

By Patrick A. Reed

Twenty five years ago, in 1989, there was nothing bigger than Tim Burton’s Batman.  The movie was a box-office smash, and was accompanied by an unprecedented merchandising blitz.  Bat-trading cards, Bat-shirts, Bat-soundtracks, Bat-toys, Bat-meals, Bat-hats, Bat-candy, Bat-books – the logo and likenesses were everywhere you looked.  And the film’s impact is still being felt today.  It was a big-budget production with proper movie stars that changed the way the world thought about comic book movies evermore.

Earlier this summer, ComicsAlliance published a series of pieces reflecting on the importance of Batman ’89 – and now, as the summer of 2014 winds to a close, we spoke to screenwriter Sam Hamm about his work on the landmark film and his thoughts on its legacy as a perfect postscript to our 25th anniversary Bat-celebration.

ComicsAlliance: Were there any cut sequences that you wish had made it into the finished film?

Sam Hamm:Several!

1)  I had a highly ingenious third-act introduction for the Bat-signal that I still miss.

2) I had originally handled the murder of Bruce’s parents as a dream Vicki has after being spirited off to the Batcave and recognizing Bruce behind his cowl. The plotline of Vicki accidentally discovering Batman’s identity by digging into Bruce’s past was mostly lost in the finished picture.

3) The studio insisted on having Robin in the picture, and Tim and I couldn’t figure out how or where to squeeze him in. We spent a whole weekend pacing around in a sweat, but we couldn’t get anywhere, and we finally decided that we would have to call the WB brass and tell them there would be no Robin. Then, moments away from picking up the phone, we started spitballing again, and miraculously, we came up with a really cool Robin sequence. So a couple of years later, when production is underway, and the picture is running over budget, what does the studio decide to cut? You guessed it – Robin!  And in the end, nobody missed him.

READ MORE

sherlock-hannibal:

Gordon Ramsay doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge x

redtemplo:

dillspage:

Coming together since the 60s (probably before then…where’s my history book?)

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